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Jargon Buster

Last updated on by Freeola Support

Welcome to the Freeola internet customer support pages. This guide is designed to provide more information on some of the terms that are used on the help pages, or that may be used throughout the website or the internet in general.

For more internet help topics please visit our main Support Page.

The main sections of the Jargon Buster are listed below. 

  1. Broadband Jargon

  2. Dial Up Jargon

  3. Domain Jargon

  4. Email Jargon

  5. Home Networking Jargon

  6. Hosting Jargon

  7. Miscellaneous Jargon

  8. Software Jargon

  9. Website Jargon


Specialist words, or terms used in the definitions of other terms, can be seen in bold text and will be defined elsewhere in this guide.

Broadband Jargon Explained

Listed below are the meanings of some terms you may need to know if you're connecting to the internet through ADSL, ADSL2+, Cable or Fibre Optic (FTTC/FTTP) lines.

Additionally, there is more information on our broadband services on the Freeola Broadband Page.

ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line)

This is the technology used to provide a Broadband connection. There are two variations of this technology that Freeola currently use, these are ADSL and ADSL2+. ADSL allows up to 8Mb and is available to customers on 20CN and 21CN Exchanges. This rate however is also affected by other limiting factors such as your distance from the exchange and your line quality.

ADSL2+ (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line 2 Plus)

ADSL2+ is the more recent updated technology that provides Broadband connections. ADSL2+ allows a higher maximum downstream rate of 24Mb and a higher upstream rate of up to 3.3 Mbit/s (with Annex M). This rate however is still also affected by other limiting factors such as your distance from the Exchange and your line quality.

You can learn more about ADSL/ADSL2+ and the broadband speeds, visit our Broadband page.

Bandwidth

The amount of data that can be transmitted in a fixed amount of time. Bandwidth is usually expressed in Bits per second(bps) or Bytes per second. In terms of Broadband, the amount of bandwidth that someone is using can affect other devices that are connected to the same Router, as one device can use a higher percentage of the bandwidth leaving a smaller percentage for other devices.

Broadband

A technology used to access the Internet via a standard Telephone Line. Data is transmitted at a higher frequency than used for voice calls and, as such, a broadband connection does not prevent you making calls while connected to the Internet, as older technologies did.

Additionally, there is more information on our broadband services on the Freeola Broadband Page.

BT I-Plate/BT Broadband Accelerator

The i-Plate is a ADSL Microfilter for use on ADSL Broadband lines to improve the speed & stability of the connection if using a specific type of older telephone socket.

When connected to the master socket, the iPlate filters the bell wire which used to be needed to make our old-fashioned analogue telephones ring. With today's phones, this bell wire is now redundant and its presence in a master socket causes digital interference on the ADSL line which can slow the speed of your broadband.

Cache

A cache is a temporary storage location which is used to store features of websites you have visited such as images, banners and text. The purpose of this is to improve the loading speed of these websites when you visit them again by using the cache to retrieve the features of the website quicker than they would be received from the internet.

Cookie

A cookie is a piece of information which is stored on your Hard Disk Drive which is created when websites need to remember a piece of information about you. For example, if you tick a 'Remember My Username' box when logging onto a website then this will create a cookie with your username as the stored information, this will then be recalled next time you log in and you will not have to type in your username.

Data

Data is any type of information that is input into a computer which doesn't give a set of instructions to the computer, so anything that is not a program or coding can be referred to as data.

Data Allowance

The amount of Data that can be sent or received from your internet connection per month without incurring additional charges. This is often referred to as 'Peak Allowance' because the data allowance does not include any usage during Off Peak Times

All tariffs offered on Freeola Internet Connections have no data limits.

Dongle

A device that connects to a computer in order to connect to the internet via a mobile connection. More typically used for laptops and netbooks, Dongles are usually in the form of USB sticks.

DSL (Digital Subscriber Line)

A commonly used abbreviation of ADSL.

DSL/Telephone Cable

The cable used to connect your Modem / Router to the Microfilter at your telephone socket. This cable is commonly black or grey and has an RJ11 connector each side.

Ethernet Cable

A cable commonly used to Network computers and other devices. If you are using a Router, you will usually use this cable to create a connection from your PC to your router or router to NTE Fibre socket. This cable is commonly grey or yellow and has an RJ45 connector each side.

Exchange

This refers to the local telephone exchange where the telephone line connects to your ISP's Network.

Fair Usage Policy

Fair usage policy is mostly used on packages which are advertised as unlimited to stop individuals abusing the service and making it slower for other users. Fair usage policies apply most frequently to services such as Broadband, phone contracts and peer to peer programs. Fair usage policy limits are usually set at a limit which would be hard to exceed, so only a small percentage of customers are warned about or charged extra for their usage.

Fibre Optic Broadband

A technology used to access the Internet via a Fibre Optic Cable. Due to the use of less copper cabling, speeds far greater than standard ADSL/ADSL2+ can be achieved.

You can learn more about Fibre broadband services offered by Freeola, on our Broadband page.

FTTC (Fibre to the Cabinet)

This is the term used by Broadband providers to describe the provision of fibre based services where the fibre optic cable runs from the local exchange to the street cabinets. From the cabinets the service is then provided over conventional telephone lines. Higher downstream and upstream speed can be achieved as the length of the telephone line is greatly reduced (running from the premises to the cabinet instead of from the premises to the cabinet and then to the exchange). This technology commonly uses VDSL to provide broadband services.

You can learn more about FTTC broadband services offered by Freeola, on our Broadband page.

FTTP (Fibre to the Premises)

This is the term used by Broadband providers which means that fibre optic cable is laid out not only to the local street cabinet, but to individual premises, removing the requirement for a consensual telephone line. The technology can provide even higher broadband speeds than FTTC and is slowly being rolled out to all premises within the UK.

You can learn more about FTTP broadband services offered by Freeola, on our Broadband page.

GB (Gigabyte)

This is used as a storage or speed measurement in computing terms. In terms of connection speed, 1GB Downstream Broadband is currently the fastest available connection offered by Freeola Broadband.

Hub

Hardware that connects computers to one another on a local Network. A Hub usually has a number of Ethernet Ports which each device is plugged into, this allows you to create a network using one Router with a number of wired connections.

IP Address (Internet Protocol Address)

An IP address is the address of a machine or Network according to the Internet Protocol. The way the address is formatted depends on the version of the Internet protocol that is in use. Versions include IPv4 and IPv6. A Static IP Address is provided with all Freeola Broadband connections.

IPv4 (Internet Protocol Version 4)

This is the version of the Internet Protocol which is primarily in use on the Internet. IPv4 addresses are usually represented as four numbers between 0 and 254 separated by dots. For example, 169.0.0.156.

IPv6 (Internet Protocol Version 6)

The version of the Internet Protocol which is planned to succeed IPv4 due to the shortage of IP Addresses available. IPv6 allows for a much greater number of potential IP addresses and, with the number of computers connecting the Internet increasing, will become more prevalent in the future. IPv6 addresses consist of 8 hexadecimal numbers between 0 and FFFF separated by colons. For example, C04:FEF2:842A:5:89C:C401:FF34:3456.

ISP (Internet Service Provider)

A provider of internet services. This is usually used to refer to the provider that you use to access the internet via Broadband. A good example of an ISP is Freeola.

Latency

Latency is the time it takes for data to pass from one point on a Network to another. A high amount of latency can increase the time it takes to load websites and can negatively impact online gaming.

While latency is most commonly affected by distance from a destination location, high latency can also be a sign of an internet issue.

For advice on improving internet speeds, please see our helpful guide.

Line Check

A line check is a way to check the availability and speed of a Broadband connection to a specific telephone line. Line checks will not give you a completely accurate figure for the speed of a broadband connection, but will give some idea of the speed that could be achieved. Ultimately internet speed is subject to a number of factors, such as the complexity of the home Network and the distance from the Exchange.

To run a line check on your premises please visit the Freeola Broadband page.

LLU (Local Loop Unbundled)

Local Loop Unbundling is a technology that allows BT to open up parts of it's telephone Exchanges to other ISPs. These providers can then install their own equipment on the lines enabling them to offer their services via the BT Network.

Sky and TalkTalk are popular examples of companies offering such a service.

Master Socket

The BT Master Socket is the main telephone point within your premises and usually located close to the front entrance. It is typically at this point the physical telephone line coming into the premises terminates.

For the most reliable internet connection it is recommended that your internet equipment is connected through this socket (ADSL and FTTC only).

Sometimes called an NTE5 socket.

MB (Megabytes)

This is used as a storage or speed measurement in computing terms. In terms of speed, 1Mb(Megabit) Broadband would be significantly slower than the average connection in the UK with average ADSL service speeds at around 11Mbps.

Microfilter

A device used to filter the Broadband signals on a Telephone Line from calls and voice communication. This device should be fitted between the telephone socket and the DSL / Telephone Cable which connects to your broadband Router / Modem. A microfilter should also be fitted at every telephone socket in use on the same line.

Some versions of the BT Telephone Socket will include a built-in microfilter.

Minimum Term Contract

A minimum term contract is a contract on a service which has a minimum amount of months of payment, for example an 18 month phone contract. If you want to cancel the contract you would be subject to a large cancellation fee.

Great News! Here at Freeola we don't have any Minimum Term Contracts on any of our current internet tariffs.

Modem (Modulator Demodulator)

Used to convert the digital signal that your Router/computer uses into a signal to be transmitted over the Telephone Line. The modem handles communication between your home Network and the Exchange.

Network

A network is a number of computers or devices that are all interconnected via the internet. The most common use of the word Network is in the term 'Home network' which refers to all of the computers and other devices such as Routers, Computers and Printers in a household.

Network Adaptor

This is a piece of Hardware that is normally built in on a computer or laptop which allows it to connect to a local Network, either wired or wirelessly. The most common Network Adapters are for Wireless Connections. A network adapter can also be referred to as a network card.

Offline

This is the status of an internet enabled device that is not connected to the internet at the time.

Online

This is the status on an internet enabled device that has connected successfully to the internet.

ONT (Optical Network Terminal)

The replacement for a standard BT Master Socket and used for FTTP connections. If you have a full fibre service the fibre optic cable will run to this point in the premises.

The ONT acts as a modem and your router is connected directly to it via an Ethernet Cable.

To run a line check on your premises for FTTP availability please visit the Freeola Broadband page.

Packets

This is a data block that is transmitted across a Network. Packets are often used to determine the strength of a connection - this is determined by sending a certain amount of packets across a connection from one end of the connection and monitoring how many packets are successfully received at the other end.

Peak and Off Peak

These terms are used to describe the hours of the day when Broadband or any other service is used the most or least. Peak hours are the hours of the day when the service is used the most. Off peak are the hours of the day when the service is used the least. Previously many ISPs restricted uses through one or both of these periods, although this has been mostly phased out.

Ping Test

A PING test will send a series of short, small, connections to a web site (or IP) address and monitor both completion and response time. You may be asked to complete a Ping Test if you have reported connection issues to your ISP.

A guide on running this testing through different Operating Systems can be seen in our helpful guide.

Ports

This is a slot in a device for a cable. For example, a Router has a number of Ports designed for Ethernet Cables and your computer will have a matching port allowing you to connect them via Ethernet Cable.

Protocol

This is a standardised set of rules for communication between computer systems. This can be thought of in human terms as a language. Depending on what task is being carried out, a different protocol may be used. For internet connections the protocol used will largely be either PPPoA or PPPoE.

PSK (Pre-Shared Key)

This is an Encryption key that would be 'shared' between all the people that need to be able to view encrypted information. The key is a combination of digits and letters which unscramble the information that had been previously encrypted so that it can be viewed.

Most commonly, PSKs are used for connecting to a wireless network.

PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network)

The combination of telephone lines and fibre cables that allow you to make and receive landline telephone calls.

In the UK, this feature is slowly being phased out as part of BT's WLR Withdrawal, with complete removal expected by the end of 2025.

For more details on the WLR Withdrawal and Landline Switchoff please visit our WLR Withdrawal information page.

Router

A router is a device used to forward packets of Data on to the next location. Most modern Routers contain a built in Modem so they can receive information from your computer and forward this information down your Telephone Line to the Broadband equipment at the Exchange, and vice-versa.

SoGEA (Single Order Generic Ethernet Access)

An FTTC internet service that does not require an active telephone line. As part of BT's planned WLR Shutdown before the end of 2025, this data-only connection is now being offered to allow an internet connection without the need for an active PSTN service.

Eventually all internet services within the UK should be FTTP or SoGEA services.

To check if your line is able to connect using this technology, please visit Freeola's Broadband page and enter your line and address details.

Static IP Address

A fixed IP Address which doesn't change when you reconnect to the Internet.

All Freeola Broadband customers are provided with a static IP as standard with their broadband connection.

Streaming

A method of relaying Data over a computer Network as a steady continuous stream, allowing individuals to play or view the data (e.g video files) while the download is still incomplete and further data is still being received.

Popular streaming services include BBC iPlayer, Netflix and Disney+.

Tariff

This is a set price for an agreed service, for example, the Freeola Broadband Tariffs on the main Freeola Broadband page.

Trace Route Test

A Trace Route test will run a normal connection to a web site or IP address and monitor response times for each 'hop', or leg, of the request. As this can be used to identify some common connection issues, you may be asked to complete this test if you have reported connection issues to your ISP.

A guide on running this testing through different Operating Systems can be seen in our helpful guide.

VoIP (Voice over IP)

VoIP stands for Voice over Internet Protocol and is sometimes referred to as an IP phone. VoIP technology converts your voice into a digital signal, allowing you to make calls over the internet.

Like a traditional landline, some call charges and monthly fees will apply when using VoIP to call a landline or mobile number. App-to-app calls (such as Whatsapp) are almost always free.

Due to the WLR Withdrawal, anybody still desiring to have a 'Home Phone' would need to transition to VoIP services before the end of 2025.

WEP (Wireless Equivalent Privacy)

A wireless Encryption algorithm which uses a 64bit, 128bit or 256bit key to prevent unauthorised access to the wireless Network. This has since been replaced by WPA and WPA2 due to security issues and the need to remember a long hexadecimal code.

Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity) 

Term that is commonly used to refer to a Wireless Connection provided through the use of a wireless router.

Sometimes incorrectly used for Internet Connection.

Wireless Connection

A wireless connection is a connection that uses radio signals to transmit Data rather then using a cable, and is commonly used to provide an internet connection over a larger area than cables would allow, such as a home, shop or arena.

The signal is provided through a Wireless Router.

Wireless N

Currently the largest commercially available wireless protocol for home networking. Almost all modem/routers and routers available will use Wireless N to transmit their network.

Wireless AC

Capable of speeds over 1Gbps and utilising multiple antenna. It's recommended to use a router with wireless AC support if you have multiple wireless devices connected, or want to make full use of the currently available fastest broadband connections.

Wireless 6E

WiFi 6 is the next-gen standard in WiFi technology, also known as AX WiFi or 802.11ax WiFi.

Using the 6GHz band the amount of channel 'space' available is vastly larger (around quadruple) over previous wireless technologies. This means less WiFi interference from other devices, lower latency, faster transfer speeds and more devices connected to a single unit.

While Wireless 6E is still not available in all markets, it is expected to soon become the standard for all new routers.

WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access)

A wireless security Protocol which is designed to be more secure then WEP. In Home Networking, the Pre-shared Key (PSK) version is normally used, which allows a password to be specified which would then need to be entered into all devices before they can access the Network.

WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access 2)

An enhanced version of WPA which uses AES Encryption rather then TKIP to reduce vulnerabilities.

WWW (World Wide Web)

A global collection of web pages, indexed using domain names, website addresses and IP Addresses.


Dial Up Jargon Explained

While no longer offered within the United Kingdom, these Dial-Up terms have been left in place here for prosperity.

Dial Up

Dial-up was a technology that was used to access the Internet via a Telephone Line. A connection was established by dialling the telephone number of the Internet Service Provider. Data was then transferred by sending tones back and forth along the line. Due to the nature of dial-up and the frequencies it used, it was not possible to make or receive calls while a dial-up connection was active.

Due to the age of this technology, Freeola withdrew dial-up services in February 2019.

Dial Up Modem

A Modem device that connected to the internet by dialling a connection to the ISP that then sent and received Data using tones.

The absolute maximum connection rate a dial-up modem could achieve was 56kbps.


Domain Jargon Explained

Listed below are the meanings of some terms you may need to know if your planning on buying or already own a Domain Name.

DNS (Domain Name System)

The name of the system used by the Internet to translate host names into IP Addresses. For example whenever you visit a website, the website address is converted into an IP address by your Web Browser using DNS. A request is then sent to the Server at the IP address for the website Data.

Domain Registrar

A company that enables customers to register and sometimes host Domains. An example of a domain registrar is GetDotted.

Expiry

Domain names can only be registered for set periods, up to 10 years. When a domain name reaches the end of it's registration period it expires.

Before, and usually for a period after, expiry a domain name can be Renewed by the existing owner - extending their ownership of it.

Any domain name registered through Freeola & GetDotted can be renewed directly through the Domain Renewal page.

Nominet

Nominet are the organisation responsible for the registry of all domain names ending in .UK. If you have registered a .UK domain name, through any Domain Registrar, it will ultimately be managed by Nominet.

To learn more about Nominet and their role in the industry, or to manage your .UK domain name, visit the Nominet website.

rDNS (Reverse Domain Name System Lookup)

A reverse DNS lookup or reverse DNS resolution (rDNS) is used to find the Domain name(s) that are associated with an IP Address using the Domain Name System (DNS).

This test is commonly used to verify that an email you have received is genuinely from the address it claims, and is a useful tool for reducing unsolicited mail to email servers.

Redemption Recovery

When Top Level Domain names Expire a period of 35 to 40 days is available to the Registrant to renew for that standard renewal cost. After this period, the Domain Registry place the domain name into a Redemption status.

This status is put in place until the full archiving of the domain (70 to 90 days after Expiry) and reduces the options to renew to that of a single year (12 months from the expiry date) at a significantly increased cost.

Registrant

The domain registrant is the owner of a domain name.

Typically domain names will be registered to an individual person, but (in some cases) be registered to a Registered Business, Charity or Organisation.

Renewal

The process through which domain name ownership is extended before, or shortly after, Domain Expiry.

Domains can be registered for a period of up to 10 years ahead of the current date, typically in 1 or 2 year increments.

Any domain name registered through Freeola & GetDotted can be renewed directly through the Domain Renewal page.

Subdomains

When you sign up for a Hosting service, you can run several websites from your account. The first Domain name you register or host would be referred to as your domain, further domains registered under the same account may be referred to as subdomains.

A common use for a subdomain is to separate one small section of your website, for example a Shop, and give it it's own URL such as shop.yourdomain.com.

TLD (Top Level Domain)

A combination of letters which can be used as part of a Domain name. Each Top Level Domain is specific to one domain name registry which manages all domain names that use that TLD. For example, .uk, .com and .net are common examples of Top Level Domains.

WHOIS Record

The WHOIS Record of a domain name is a publicly viewable record of important information regarding a registered domain name.

This record will usually show, at a minimum, when the domain name was registered and when it expires, to which registrar the domain name is registered to, and the current DNS that hosts services for the domain.

If a domain name registrant has chosen not to hide their contact information (hidden by default for all Freeola & GetDotted domain names) this will also appear on the WHOIS Record.


Email Jargon Explained

Listed below are the meanings of some terms you may need to know if you're setting up or using Email.

Authenticated SMTP

The term sometimes used to describe an SMTP server that requires authentication to send using it, typically a Username and Password.

Requiring authentication for SMTP helps greatly reduce the number of 'spam' messages being sent by a server. As such, Authenticated SMTP is used - as standard - by most Email Providers.

Both Freeola EmailPro and One Address use Authenticated SMTP for the sending of mail.

Autoresponders

An email function that automatically returns a pre-written message to anyone who sends Email to a particular E-mail Address. This is popular for Out of Office notifications.

An autoresponder can be set either within your Email Client or via your Email Provider.

All domain email addresses held with Freeola can set an Autoresponder at no additional cost via MyFreeola.

"BCC:" (Blind Carbon Copy)

A Blind Carbon Copy or BCC is a field on most Email Clients which allows you to send your message to a Contact without anyone in the 'to:' or 'cc:' field seeing that you have sent it to them on the Email information. 

"CC:" (Carbon Copy)

A Carbon Copy or CC is a field on most Email Clients which allows you to send a copy of your message to a number of other Contacts other than those in the 'to:' field. 

Contacts / Address Book

A list of e-mail addresses stored by your Email Client or Webmail allowing quick access to your regular recipients. Your contact list will also typically allow you to store names, dates and other contact information for your recipient.

Freeola's Webmail provides a Contact List feature with options to import your list from other Email Clients.

Email

Email is derived from Electronic Mail and is a technology used for sending and receiving messages over the Internet. In order to use email, you require an Email Address, any messages then sent to your email address are held by your provider until you wish to access them using an Email Client or Webmail.

Email Protocols include POP3, IMAP and SMTP.

Email Address

An email address is an address used to identify where to send an Email message to. An email address is broken into two parts, firstly a mailbox name or alias, secondly a Domain name. This is represented in the format of [email protected]

The domain name is usually provided by your Email Provider, unless you have purchased your own. The mailbox name or alias is usually customisable and can be created using a combination of letters, numbers and other valid characters. An example of an email address would be [email protected]

Register your own fully personalised Email Address at GetDotted

Email Client

A program that runs on your device which will download and send your email messages as required. Popular email clients include Microsoft Outlook, Windows Mail, Mozilla Thunderbird and Mac Mail.

Guides on setting up the most popular mail clients with a Freeola e-mail address can be seen on our Support Pages.

Email Provider

An email provider is a company that provides an email service to customers either on your own domain name or a domain name they provide.

A good example of an email provider is Freeola, although Google and Microsoft could also be considered such companies.

Freeola EmailPro is available for just £2 per month and covers all email addresses on your domain name.

Forwarding

Email forwarding is the act of forwarding a received message to another email address either manually or automatically.

If you have received a message within your Email Client or Webmail that you wish to send along to another address, the Forward button will allow you to do so quickly - adding your own comments if you so wish.

It is also possible to set up automatic forwarding that will immediately forward any message received by an account to another. This can be useful for old accounts you may be 'winding down' or addresses not used frequently.

All domain email addresses held with Freeola have access to Automatic Email Forwarding at no additional cost via MyFreeola.

IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol)

The IMAP protocol allows for Synchronised Email across multiple devices.

For example, if you start composing an Email on your laptop at home in the morning, you will be able to access the draft on your mobile device on your way to work on the train. Similarly, if you read an e-mail on your laptop, and then access your e-mail from your home computer, that same e-mail will automatically appear as having already been read. Any actions performed on your messages will remain intact regardless of where, when & how you access them.

The IMAP mail protocol is available through our EmailPro service.

Phishing

This is the fraudulent act of attempting to obtain personal information such as credit card details via electronic means, usually by Email. For example, someone who is phishing may send the potential victim an email stating that they are owed a large sum of money in an attempt to entice them into replying with bank details.

Also known as Spam Email.

Protect yourself from Phishing with EmailPro's fully customisable Spam Filters.

POP3 (Post Office Protocol 3)

This is a Protocol used by Email to allow users to access their email messages via an Email Client. POP3 allows direct access to the messages that are stored on the Server.

By default, if using POP3, most Email Clients will access the Server, download any messages, then delete these messages from the Server so that they are not downloaded again.

Server

A computer with a special service function on a Network, generally receiving and connecting incoming information traffic.

In terms of Email, this server would deal with the storage, sending and receiving of Emails. 

SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol)

This is the Protocol used to transfer Email between providers. SMTP is used to both send messages from your Email Client to your provider, and from your provider to the recipient's provider.

Synchronised Email

This is the term that is given to Email services which use IMAP as this allows access to your email from a number of devices, including mobile phones, tablets and laptops.

It is 'synchronised' because if you are using your Email Client, you log onto your Email from a different device, then edit a message or make any other change, you can see it on another device next time a Send/Receive is completed.

The IMAP mail protocol is available through our EmailPro service.

Webmail

Webmail is a basic Email Client allowing access to an email account via a website address instead of software on your device. This can be useful if you wish to view your emails from a shared computer or are otherwise unable to use a mail client.

Freeola Webmail access is included for all email addresses subscribed to EmailPro or One Address.


Home Networking Jargon Explained

Listed below are the meanings of some terms that you may need to know if you're setting up your home Network.

Ethernet Cable

A cable commonly used to network computers and other devices. If you are using a Router, you will usually use this cable to create a connection from your device to your router, unless using a Wireless Connection. This cable is commonly grey or yellow and has an RJ45 connector each side.

Hub

Hardware that connects computers to one another on a local Network. A Hub usually has a number of Ethernet Ports which each device is plugged into, this enables a network on one Router with a number of wired connections.

IP Address (Internet Protocol Address)

An IP address is the address of a machine or Network according to the Internet Protocol. The way the address is formatted depends on the version of the Internet protocol that is in use.

Versions include IPv4 and IPv6.

IPv4 (Internet Protocol Version 4)

This is the version of the Internet Protocol which is primarily in use on the Internet. IPv4 addresses are usually represented as four numbers between 0 and 254 separated by dots. For example 169.0.0.156. 

IPv6 (Internet Protocol Version 6)

The version of the Internet Protocol which is planned to succeed IPv4 due to the shortage of IP Addresses available. IPv6 allows for a much greater number of potential IP addresses and, with the number of computers connecting the Internet increasing, will become more prevalent in the future.

IPv6 addresses consist of 8 hexidecimal numbers between 0 and FFFF separated by colons. For example C04:FEF2:842A:5:89C:C401:FF34:3456.

LAN (Local Area Network)

This is a computer Network that connects computers and devices in small areas such as homes, schools or offices. The most popular means of doing this are using Wi-Fi or Ethernet Cabling.

Mesh WiFi / Mesh Wireless

A WiFi system designed to eliminate wireless 'dead zones' and provide uninterrupted WiFi throughout your home.

Unlike traditional WiFi routers, mesh systems have multiple access ports instead of just one. With mesh hardware situated around the home, you can provide strong Wireless signal to any device within your home network regardless of location in the building.

Network

A network is a number of computers or devices that are all interconnected via the internet. The most common use of the word network is in the term 'Home network' which refers to all of the computers and other devices such as Routers, Hubs and Printers in a household.

Network Adaptor

This is a piece of Hardware that is either built in or external on a computer which allows it to connect to a local Network, either wired or wireless. The most common Network Adapters are for Wireless Connections.

Internal network adapters can also be referred to as a network card

Ports

This is a slot in a device for a cable. For example, a Router has a number of ports designed for Ethernet cables.

Powerline Adapter / HomePlug

Devices that can extend your home network range potentially further than wireless or cables can. If you are receiving poor wireless signal to devices in one area of your premises, you may be advised to try Powerline Adapters.

Powerline Adapters work through the electrical cables within your premises. Just connect one directly to an Ethernet Cable that is connected to your router and plug it into an available plug socket. You can then plug a second (or more) unit into another plug socket within the premises to which you can connect your device using another Ethernet Cable.

While the connection speed won't be as fast as a 'pure' cabled connection, in most cases the difference is negligible.

PSK (Pre Shared Key)

This is an Encryption key that would be 'shared' between all the people that need to be able to view encrypted information. The key is a combination of digits and letters which unscramble the information that had been previously encrypted so that it can be viewed.

The most common usage of a PSK would be a wireless network password.

Router

A router is a device used to forward packets of data on to the next location. For home networking, a router would typically be used to connect all of your devices to the internet.

Server

A computer with a special service function on a network, generally receiving and connecting incoming information traffic. In terms of Home Networking, servers are typically used for the sharing of data or for a personal website.

Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity)

Term abbreviating Wireless Fidelity that is commonly used to refer to a Wireless Connection (IEEE 802.11).

Wireless Connection

A wireless connection is a connection that uses radio signals to transmit Data rather then using a cable, and is commonly used in a home Network to connect a computer or device (such as a mobile phone) to a wireless Router.

Wireless N

A wireless technology claiming to be capable of faster speeds then Wireless G (108Mbps) and capable of Data transmission over greater distances.

WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access)

A wireless security Protocol which is designed to be more secure then WEP. In Home Networking, the Pre-shared Key (PSK) version is normally used, which allows a password to be used before access is given to the network.

WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access 2)

An enhanced version of WPA which uses AES Encryption rather then TKIP to reduce vulnerabilities.


Hosting Jargon Explained 

Listed below are the meanings of some terms you may need to know about Hosting a website.

A Records

An A Record is a DNS record which holds an IP Address for a Domain or Subdomain. Anyone that then visits that domain or subdomain is directed to the Server with the set IP address. The main use of an A Record is to point a domain name to the webserver that hosts the website, although other uses exist.

Changing an A Record for a Freeola held domain name is quick and easy. Please see Our Guide on DNS Changes for more information.

Captcha

A program intended to distinguish human from machine input, typically as a way of thwarting spam and automated extraction of Data from websites. This website add-on asks the visitor to type a randomly generated code of digits and letters, or select from a grid of images.

Cloud Hosting

Cloud Hosting is the process by which an individual can host their service or website from a secondary source which is not limited to the capacity of the Hardware that that individual physically has.

Cloud hosting allows individuals to eliminate the failure point of a single Server if there is a spike in demand for their service, by feeding their customers into a cloud which has numerous servers and numerous Networks so that no individual server is running at maximum capacity.

CMS (Content Management System)

A web based system usually programmed in a Server side language which allows users to actively develop, update and maintain their website using a friendly online interface. A CMS can be installed onto a web server in place of a website.

Popular CMS including Wordpress and Joomla are both included in Freeola's One Click Install feature.

FTP (File Transfer Protocol)

This a Protocol used to transfer files from one computer to another. Freeola use FTP to allow users to access files on their Web Space directly.

Freeola Support recommend using Filezilla to upload your web files.

HTML (HyperText Markup Language)

A coding standard that is used for webpages on the Internet. HTML is used to present a web page in a way that a computer can understand and transmit easily. For example, whenever a webpage is visited on the World Wide Web, HTML code is sent to your computer which tells your computer what to display. This is then processed and the webpage that the HTML describes is displayed on screen.

HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol)

Used to transfer hypertext requests and information between Servers and Web Browsers.

HTTPS (HyperText Transfer Protocol Secure)

A combination of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol with the SSL/TLS Protocol to provide encrypted communications.

HTTPS connections to websites have become more popular as many search engines and Browsers now highlight the use of extra encryption (or lack thereof).

You can add HTTPS to your Freeola hosted website by purchasing an SSL Certificate.

MX Record (Mail Exchanger Record)

A DNS record used to direct email traffic to the correct mail Server. An MX record can be set to either be an IP Address or a host name.

MySQL (My Structured Query Language)

An open source relational database system based on SQL. MySQL is commonly used for web based applications such as Content Management Systems to store page information and Shopping Carts to store the products.

MySQL databases are included in the MySQL Web Hosting service provided by Freeola.

Name Server

A name Server is a server used to resolve DNS requests. For example, when you attempt to visit a web page using a website address, a request is sent to a name server to obtain the IP Address of the web server which hosts the website.

PHP (PHP HyperText Preprocessor)

A programming language that can be used to create interactive websites. PHP is commonly used for Content Management Systems and for sending mail forms.

SEO (Search Engine Optimisation)

The name given to the process of optimising a website specifically for Search Engines in an attempt to make the website appear nearer the top of the results when a search is run. 

Server

A computer with a special service function on a Network, generally receiving and connecting incoming information traffic. In terms of website hosting, a server would be used to store the website files.

SQL (Structured Query Language)

A technology used to create and manage Data in a relational database format. Information in an SQL database is stored in tables which can be quickly queried (searched) as required.

SSL Certificates (Secure Sockets Layer Certificate)

SSL (or secure sockets layer) is used to encrypt and decrypt the information between browser and Server, to ensure Data transmitting over an open Network cannot be intercepted and abused. Used primarily when a website takes private and confidential information from users such as user names, passwords and any other personal data.

You purchase an SSL Certificate for your Freeola Hosted website allowing your visitors to view your website securely.

Web Space/Web Hosting

Refers to an online storage space which is used to store your website files. When somebody visits your website, your web space is scanned for the relevant files, they are then loaded and sent to the computer requesting your site as required.

Freeola offers a range of hosting services on our Web Hosting Page.


Miscellaneous Jargon Explained

Listed below are the meanings of some general computing terms that are used frequently.

Bits

A unit of information expressed as either a 0 or 1 in binary code, used to store Data.  

Bytes

A group of 8 Bits, used to store Data

Cache

A cache is a temporary storage location which is used to store features of websites such as images, banners and text from websites which you have visited. The purpose of this is to improve the loading speed of these websites when you visit them again by using the cache to retrieve the features of the website quicker than they would be received from the internet.

Sometimes it may be necessary to clear your cache to remove issues viewing a website. A guide on how to do this can be found within the Freeola Support Centre.

Cookies

A cookie is a piece of information which is stored on your Hard Disk Drive which is created when websites need to remember a piece of information about you.

For example, if you tick a 'Remember My Username' box when logging onto an online program then this will create a cookie with your username as the stored information, this will then be recalled next time you log in and you will not have to type in your username.

Download

The process of receiving and copying one or more files from an online source to your own device (e.g. a Mobile Phone, PC or Tablet).

HDD (Hard Disk Drive)

A magnetic medium for storing digital information on most computers and electronic equipment that process digital Data. Due to the way the Data is stored, HDD's provide a slower performance when compared to an SSD.

RAM (Random Access Memory)

A form of computer Data storage. It takes the form of integrated circuits that allow stored data to be accessed in any order, which is why it is called 'Random Access.'

SSD (Solid State Drive)

Used for storing digital information within a computer or other device. Due to the way the Data is stored on an SSD, performance is greatly increased over an HDD.

Support Ticket

A Support Ticket is the support system we use for answering written queries and questions about our services/products and solving customer problems.

If a ticket is registered, it is sent to our support team who answer the question and then send the ticket back. 

Send a Freeola Support Ticket

VoIP Call (Voice Over Internet Protocol Call)

A communications Protocol that allows for telephonic communication via the Internet.

If non-mobile telephone access is required after the WLR Withdrawal, then a VoIP service will be required.


Software Jargon Explained

Listed below are the meanings of some terms you may need to know about the Software on your computer.

Antivirus Software

An Antivirus Program is computer Software which is designed to detect and remove Virus/Malware threats on your computer.

Get Protected with Freeola's Range of ESET Antivirus Products. 

Email Client

A program that runs on your device which will download and send your email messages as required. Popular email clients include Microsoft Outlook, Windows Mail, Mozilla Thunderbird and Mac Mail.

Guides on setting up the most popular mail clients with a Freeola e-mail address can be seen on our Support Pages.

Firewall

A Software component of a computer system or Network that is designed to block unauthorized access and Virus' while permitting outward communication.

ESET Internet Security includes a firewall among it's many features.

Firmware

Permanent, non-modifiable Software programmed into a read-only memory. Updated firmware can sometimes offer new features (on a mobile device, for example) or patch security vulnerabilities or 'bugs' (on routers).

Malware

Software designed to have a negative effect on you or your computer. Malware may cause harm to your computer, harvest personal information or display adverts.

Get Protected with Freeola's Range of ESET Antivirus Products.

Operating System

An operating system is the Software on your computer which controls both the computer Hardware and provides the user with an on screen environment that they can use to operate the system.

Examples of operating systems include Microsoft Windows, Apple OS, Android and GNU/Linux.

Patch

To correct, enhance, or modify Software by inserting a patch. This is similar to an update, but is more specific as patches are usually released to fix a certain bug or glitch.

Patches are commonly included within Operating System, Video Game and App updates.

Software

The programs and other operating information used by a computer. Common Software examples include Email Clients, Video Games, Word Processing Programs and Media Players.

Web Browser

Computer program used to browse pages on the World Wide Web. Common Web Browsers include Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari and Microsoft Edge.


Website Jargon Explained

Listed below are the meanings of some terms you may need to know if you're building your own website.

Blog

Derived from Web Log. This is a web based log which is usually used to report on the day-to-day experiences of a person or to present news about a company or product.

CMS (Content Management System)

A web based system usually programmed in a Server side language which allows users to actively develop, update and maintain their website using a friendly online interface. A CMS can be installed onto a web server in place of a website.

Popular CMS including Wordpress and Joomla are both included in Freeola's One Click Install feature.

Forum

Online discussion board which is divided into categories. Visitors are able to browse, read through and post messages in existing discussions (threads) within a category, or create their own discussion (thread) entirely.

With many 'instant' communication services now available, forums are becoming less and less popular.

Hit Counter

A hit counter is a computer Software program that indicates the number of visitors, or 'hits', a webpage has received.

A relic of early internet websites, Hit Counters are no longer used on modern sites due to the abundance of far better analytical data provided by Search Engines and Hosting providers.

Moderator

In an online forum or blog, a moderator is an individual who has control over what posts or messages are displayed. The purpose of a moderator is to avoid displaying posts which may be offensive, criminal or not fit for the audience of that particular forum or blog. 

Responsive Site

A website that is programmed in such a way that it allows different elements of the site, like the side bar or navigation, to change size and move in order to fit the different screen sizes it can be viewed on.

With mobile browsing becoming more popular, having a website that is compatible with smaller screens is more of a requirement than ever.

All websites designed in Freeola's RQS Builder are automatically responsive and adapt to any screen size.

Shopping Cart/Trolley

As with the physical namesake, this part of a website stores your purchases until you 'checkout' and pay. While not relevant for all websites, any site that offers products or digital services will likely have a Trolley section in place.


If you are still unsure of the meaning of any of the terms listed above or have any other related queries please send our dedicated Support Team a Support Ticket with your question, or for a faster response all our Support Team, available 7 Days a week, on 01376 55 60 60.


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